Some Good News for a Change

Today brought some welcome good news.  We can ship our embryos from the West Coast to the East Coast without engaging in a lengthy process with the NY state health department.  The department very recently (within the last week) gave effect to a new policy that will not require us to obtain an exemption letter (the estimated time line on that was anywhere from two weeks to over three months).

The LP and I fastidiously signed and filled out many consent and waiver forms (you have to promise not to sue the people who tell you they could lose or destroy your babies-in-waiting if you want to use a shipping company to do this – and we need a shipping company to do this given that we do not live on either the West Coast or the East Coast) and I have handed over my credit card information.  Now I wait to find out when we can expect wee Gertrude and Alice (I decided not to go with Ernie and Bert even though those embryos resulted in a successful pregnancy; I felt like I was encroaching on her territory after she sweetly told me she’d named her embryos after the cute muppet pair) to make their way across the continent.

In the meantime… I have been trying to find a skilled endometriosis surgeon in my neck of the woods.  I am of the view that having the laparoscopy before any more IVF treatments would be prudent.  The LP is scared of me having surgery and would rather we try without it.  The first time he witnessed me having surgery (D&C number one in January 2011), the surgeon came and told him my blood pressure had dropped dangerously low and they had to give me fluids intravenously and therefore I would have to spend the night in the hospital (despite the earlier advice that I could leave shortly after leaving recovery).

The second time he waited for me to get out recovery after surgery (from D&C number two in September 2013), things were better because I told the doctor about my reaction to general anaesthetic.  But then my blood pressure was checked in the room they carted me into post-recovery and it was something along the lines of 80/50 and the nurse checking on me nearly lost it.  I explained that my “normal” blood pressure ranges between 87-95 over 60-65 so this was not a big deal.  She looked skeptical but when I proved that I could make my way to and from the little girl’s room and that I was not losing buckets of blood, she approved our departure.

In addition to the blood pressure, I puke when waking up from under general anaesthetic.  I should say I dry heave because of course you are never allowed to eat before these events if they are scheduled. The anti-nausea meds work for this little problem so it has never been a huge concern for me.  I am not worried about the idea of having surgery.  I am worried about wasting another embryo because I did not have the surgery and maybe that could have toned down my immune issues and made the difference.

Today I asked the Universe and God if the news about the removal of the exemption letter requirement was a sign that I should follow the LP’s preference and try the FET using Dr. Braverman’s immune protocol without doing the laparoscopy for endometriosis diagnosis/excision first.  I asked for a sign as I was walking to meet the LP to sign a number of consents related to the embryo transportation.  I found myself staring at a decorative plaque in the window of the nearby flower shop.

The sign read “IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A SIGN THIS IS IT”.

Really, Universe?  Just like that? Is that my intuition clubbing me over the head or mere coincidence?

On a serious note, I’d love to hear what you would do in my shoes.  So… what would you do?

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29 thoughts on “Some Good News for a Change

  1. I don’t have any advice, but I am super glad to hear that you can ship your embryos without as much hassle as expected! I am wishing you all the very best no matter what decision you make! Hugs!

  2. I am so happy that you can easily transport the embryos! This is just awesome news. And, I love the sign – even a skeptic like me probably couldn’t ignore that one!
    As for finding a surgeon, I have no advice. But I can completely relate to your experience with blood pressure dropping. This is exactly what happened to me with our first D&C. I had never had general anesthetic before, so we didn’t know what would happen. I think it was rather scary for my husband, but I was so out of it that I didn’t really grasp the severity of the situation. The second one was better because the doctors were prepared for it. It’s actually now my opinion that D&C is harder on my husband and misoprostol/cytotec is harder on me. Anyways, I have no advice on how to proceed, but thought I’d commiserate with your about anesthetic instead.

  3. I have heard of a good one in my city, but I would never send anyone to my city for surgery 🙂 Glad to hear that the embryo transfer is moving ahead smoothly. I knew that your road wasn’t going to be bumpy the entire way. 🙂

  4. I saw sit in a quiet space and just breathe, meditate if you will and if you can, then just listen to what your gut is trying to tell you. Go with whatever that is. Sometimes our braid is so focused on controlling an uncontrollable situation that we over look our gut instinct.

  5. So…. how firm are you on staying local? Because the surgeon who treated my Asherman’s is also one of the world’s best when it comes to endo. His Asherman’s surgeries are mostly done in-office with a flexible hysteroscope, not under anesthesia. I am not sure about his treatment for endo, whether he also uses minimally invasive surgery, but if a trip to Boston was something you could swing, it might be worth asking his nurse. My AS surgery was all of ten minutes, and I flew in and out on the same day.

    • You are so sweet. If I go anywhere but local all surgery and hospital expenses are 100% out-of-pocket. If I stay local, the cost is 100% covered.

      Dr. B has (graciously) offered to speak with the surgeons to whom he’d refer me if we go to the Eastern seaboard about reducing their fees but that does nothing to modify the hospital’s charges and because a lap cannot be done other than under general (I asked Dr. B this on Sunday when he called me back about my gazillion and one questions). I’d be happy to get your doctor’s information and consider him if we end up having to go that route.

      Right now, I’ve decided to (a) find out if I can get a local surgeon (within my province – I’m in Canada) who will do excision, taking photos of lesions before and after, and send samples to pathology for diagnosis of endo to do that business within the next few months (extremely unlikely – hospital time for elective surgeries here is more valuable than gold bullion and this would be considered elective since I’m not endangered by it). If it’s possible to have the surgery here but it’ll be a long wait, I’ll get my name on the wait list and go ahead with a FET through Dr. B and the IVF lab he works with in Manhattan. If that FET fails, I’ll either go to the US or I’ll get it done here depending on my options.

      I’ve decided that unless I can get the surgery ASAP here without a financial hit, it’s time to give up on the possibility of more IVF with my own eggs and stick to the two DE embryos we have (assuming they survive the trip next week – if not, there will have to be a Plan C after I completely lose it and drown my sorrows – let’s not go there!).

      Thanks again for your thoughtfulness.

  6. So in your shoes, I don’t know. But I’ll tell you I have had endo surgery 2x and I don’t know if I’d be pg right now without the one I had in Feb. I also had a bp drop afterwards and couldn’t leave (it was supposed to be outpatient). I am terrified of surgery again for the same reason. But I was okay in the end. I would speak to an anaesthesiologist about your reaction and make a specific plan before going down the surgery path. But I’m wondering if the endo is affecting your implantation? I did the lap to get rid of the endo and I also had a chocolate cyst that was smushing my ovary, PLUS a polyp in my uterine cavity. Maybe I missed something, but did Dr. Braverman recommend it?

    • Dr. Braverman recommended the surgery, yes. He said we can try once without it but if that fails I will need to do it. He also said that if I did it before any transfer it would optimize our chances (if it turns out I have endo – if not it would have been unnecessary surgery).

      I’ve told both the anesthesiologist and the surgeon before which is why it wasn’t an issue last time. I would do the same again if I had another surgery. Live and learn!

  7. Oh what a relief! I am so happy to read this. I wish I had the right advice for you, but those are some definite signs that should not be ignored! Praying and wishing for best best for yo no matter what you decide hon ❤

    • Thank you so much. I have figured out a plan (at end of today’s post) though I don’t have much hope that I will find somebody here who can do the surgery within the next 2 to 3 months. But I feel like I must at least investigate so I do not blame myself if the next cycle does not work.

      How are you feeling these days?

      • Praying you find someone there. I know things are different there and it can take a while just to get the referral to a good surgeon, but praying the planet align and make this happen for you!

        I’m good. Sorry I haven’t updated in a while. Work and life have been a little hectic, but other than some digestive issues and doing something weird to my lower back, little man and I are both doing great. I plan to sit down tomorrow and write an update 🙂

    • I am always so happy to see comments from you!

      I know, I feel like I should go buy the sign and then send it to someone when I think they are so immersed they too are missing the times when “signs” are clubbing them over the head. In my gut and heart I still believe I will have another child. I just don’t know if I’m getting the message of “when” (this lifetime or some other one) mixed up.

      I’m keeping you in my thoughts as you march forward, too, my friend. Hope you know that.

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